Harold Jackman, The Most Handsome Man In Harlem 1920’s-1930’s

harlem jackmanIf you scan the index of any reputable book on the Harlem Renaissance, you should find at least one listing for Harold Jackman.  Continue Reading →

Celebrate Harlem With A Renaissance Tour, A Drag Brunch And Vogue Dancing

The Black and LGBT community had a tremendous impact on not only the trajectory of the Harlem Renaissance but on the type of community Harlem would grow into as well. Continue Reading →

“Small Talk At 125th And Lenox,” 1970, By Gil Scott-Heron (Video)

By John Bush

A New Black Poet, Small Talk at 125th and Lenox, also known simply as Small Talk at 125th and Lenox, is the debut album of soul music and jazz poet Gil Scott-Heron, released in 1970 on Flying Dutchman Records.

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Hip, Hip, Hooray, Harlem’s Schomburg Acquires Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee Archive

The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture at The New York Public Library has acquired the full archive of actors and activists Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee. Continue Reading →

The Dessoff Choirs Celebrates the Holiday Season With Annual Trio of Festive Concerts

Hailed as “one of the great amateur choruses of our time (New York Today) for its “full-bodied sound and suppleness (The New York Times),” The Dessoff Choirs today announced its annual holiday concert series. Continue Reading →

Langston Hughes With Kids At “Our Blocks Children Garden” In Harlem 1955

A source writes that author, poet and Harlemite, Langston the “Poet-Laureate of Harlem”  Hughes in the picture is taken on 20 East 127th Street at the “Our Blocks Children Garden,” comes from a book about Hughes’ life. Continue Reading →

“The New Negro: The Life Of Alain Locke,” Who Believed Art Was Key To Black Liberation

A tiny, fastidiously dressed man emerged from Black Philadelphia around the turn of the century to mentor a generation of young artists including Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, and Jacob Lawrence and call them the New Negro – Continue Reading →