The “Crossroad To Harlem,” The Historic Apthorp Farm On The Upper West Side 1728

The Apthorp Farm and Apartment that lay on Manhattan’s Upper West Side straddled the old Bloomingdale Road, laid out in 1728, which was re-surveyed as The “Boulevard” – now Upper Broadway just south of Harlem. Continue Reading →

Claremont Park And Sakura Park In Morningside Heights In Harlem, New York 1896

Claremont Park and Sakura Park is a public park located north of West 122nd Street between Riverside Drive and Claremont Avenue in Morningside Heights in Harlem, NY. Continue Reading →

McGowan’s Pass At 110th Street, Home Of The Black Horse Tavern, McGown’s Pass Tavern, Frederick Law Olmsted And More

McGowan’s Pass (sometimes spelled “McGown’s”) is a topographical feature of Central Park in New York City, just west of Fifth Avenue and north of 102nd Street in Harlem, NY. Continue Reading →

NYC Commission On Human Rights Announces Investigation Into Central Park Race Incident

The NYC Commission on Human Rights is announcing an investigation on behalf of the City into an incident involving Amy Cooper, following video footage of Ms. Cooper calling the police on Christian Cooper (no relation to Ms. Cooper). Continue Reading →

A True Harlem Story, Catharine McGown And The Lost McGown’s Pass Tavern 1759-1917

On Wecksquaesgeek Indians’ land, nearly a century before the idea of a Central Park was sparked, Catharine McGown purchased the old stone tavern and ten acres of land in Harlem in the mid-1700s.

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Senator Hoylman Puts Anti-LGBTQ Group Running COVID-19 Field Hospital On Notice

Today, Senator Brad Hoylman put notorious anti-LGBTQ pastor Franklin Graham on notice: treat all COVID-19 patients equally at the new medical tents his non-profit organization set up in Central Park. Continue Reading →


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