Lhota Asks Riders To Eat Neatly On Subways In Wake Of Harlem Track Fire

The NY Daily News reports MTA chief Joe Lhota is now a food critic — he says to eat carefully on trains or he may ban grub altogether.

At Penn Station on Tuesday, a day after a track fire in Harlem wrecked the morning commute, Lhota said riders need to do their part to keep trash and food out of stations, and off tracks where sparks can ignite them.

A friendly public service announcement or an outright ban will be a part of a 30-day review the transit agency is conducting.

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“There have been a lot of recommendations about what foods are appropriate, what foods are not. I fully get it,” Lhota said.

Track fire leaves 12 hurt, service on A, B, C, D lines disrupted

He recalled a messy commute on a No. 2 train that had nothing to do with a signal malfunction.

“Someone got on with a Styrofoam thing of Chinese food, it looked like, and there was a lot of rice,” he said. “Inevitably, the rice fell and it was all over the place. I want to avoid things like that a lot.”

The morning rush hour blaze was sparked by a 30-foot-long trash stream strewn on tracks in a tunnel near the 145th St. station. Lhota said riders need to do their part to keep trash out of stations to prevent their commutes from going up in flames.

“Photographs show there were newspapers, as well as coffee cups,” he said. “It’s our MTA. We all have to band together.”

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But some riders weren’t sure the band can even get together.

Read the entire article here.

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