East Harlem’s Louie Lump Lump, Rao’s and Other Histories

On a December night in 2003, at Rao’s, the legendary restaurant on Pleasant Avenue in East Harlem, a man nicknamed Louie Lump Lump (pictured above) shot another patron after reportedly taking issue with his disparaging comment about the female singer’s rendition of “Don’t Rain on My Parade” from “Funny Girl.”

Walter’s World: Pre- Holiday Week of Events

By Walter Rutledge After an extended weekend of Thanksgiving dinners and robust shopping this week promises to be an eventful prelude to the holiday season. Dance, Opera and Theater abound throughout the city with many outstanding productions taking place in Harlem.

The Raz: How Sports Eased The Pain

By Marc Rasbury There is not a person over the age of 15, who does not remember what they were doing around 8:45 am on the morning of September 11, 2001. That is when a large jumbo jet crashed into the World Trade Center Tower One. About 30 minutes later, a second plane crashed into…

The Raz: Tale of Two Shortstops

By Marc “The Raz” Rasbury It is funny how fortunes can change in a (Harlem) New York minute. Two years ago, Derek Jeter was the King of New York while his Mets counter part, Jose Reyes, was being labeled an enigma. Jeter was leading the Yanks to their 27th World Series Championship whereas Reyes was…

Harlem Eateries Offering Cafe Flavor

Three new restaurants have received Community Board 10 support to open a sidewalk cafe in Central Harlem. Among them is Applebee’s chain at the corner of 125th Street and Fifth Avenue. The sidewalk cafe will be on Fifth Avenue.

Walter’s World: Philadanco at the Joyce

By Walter Rutledge Philadanco offered five performances at the Joyce Theater from March 29th to April 3rd. The company celebrated its 40th anniversary season with a program of four varied works. Each work showcased the energy and vitality that has became the trademark of the company.

Dining With Miss Lil: “Restaurant Week”

By Lil Nickelson “Restaurant Week” is held at different times and locations throughout the U.S. It showcases and promotes the finest food in eateries in each geographic region. You can enjoy creative, fresh three course meals from the area’s best restaurants for a fixed price.

Harlem’s Zora Neale Hurston 1891 – 1960

Zora Neale Hurston (January 7, 1891 – January 28, 1960) was an American folklorist and author during the time of the Harlem Renaissance, best known for the 1937 novel Their Eyes Were Watching God. In 2002, scholar Molefi Kete Asante listed Zora Neale Hurston on his list of 100 Greatest African Americans.