Fire Engine Company No. 53, Harlem, 1883

The NYTimes City Room talks about the Fire Engine Company No. 53 in East Harlem, a four-story Queen Anne and Romanesque Revival-style building that was one of 42 firehouses and related structures designed for the Fire Department by the prominent architectural firm of Napoleon LeBrun & Sons between 1879 and 1895.

Harlem Specialty Hospital and Nursing Facility Opens

New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) President Alan D. Aviles announced today that on November 24 and 25, 228 patients were successfully relocated to the Henry J. Carter Specialty Hospital and Nursing Facility in Harlem from the Goldwater Campus of the Coler-Goldwater Specialty Hospital and Nursing Facility on Roosevelt Island. 

Central Park Conservatory At 105th Street, 1900

Some time back we came across a trove of 1890s photographs showing the wide wooden steps leading down from Mount St. Vincent’s Hotel (or McGown’s Pass Tavern) to the Conservatory Gardens. We can’t find them anymore, but this 1900 wintertime picture is also useful.

Harlem to Preserve Brownstones By Creating height Limits

“… home to such African-American luminaries as composer Duke Ellington, Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall and civil rights activist W.E.B. DuBois.” Hundreds of New York City’s most glorious brownstones and majestic townhouses will be protected from developers and preserved for generations under a major rezoning proposed for West Harlem.

New $100 Million Development Planned

Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, Deputy Mayor for Economic Development Robert K. Steel and New York City Economic Development Corporation NYCEDC President Seth W. Pinsky today announced the selection of developers to rehabilitate the former Taystee Bakery Complex and the Corn Exchange Building, both located along the 125th Street commercial corridor in Harlem.

Astor Row in Harlem

Astor Row is the name given to 130th Street between Fifth Avenue and Lenox Avenue in Harlem, in the New York.More specifically, it refers to the semi-attached row houses on the south side of the street. These were among the first speculative townhouses built in Harlem, and their design is very unusual.