HW Pick: Black Girls CODE Establishes Office At Google

kimberly-bryantCrains New York reports that International nonprofit Black Girls CODE has established a permanent presence in New York City with an office at Google’s Chelsea headquarters.

The San Francisco-based organization, which connects young girls of color to opportunities in technology, will take 6,000 square feet at Google’s base at 111 Eighth Ave. The two groups celebrated the partnership at a launch event Wednesday.

“This office marks a new chapter,” said Black Girls CODE founder and Harlem fave Kimberly Bryant in a statement. “Black Girls CODE is spearheading a movement to provide girls of color with the skills they’ll need to succeed in the future, and having a home in New York City is an essential part of that goal.”

Striving to be the “Girl Scouts of technology,” Black Girls CODE offers training to girls between the ages of 7 and 17 in areas ranging from computer programming to mobile-app development.

Striving to be the “Girl Scouts of technology,” Black Girls CODE offers training to girls between the ages of 7 and 17 in areas ranging from computer programming to mobile-app development. Girls who attended the launch event got a taste of what it would be like as a programmer. During a workshop, participants learned how to develop a game.


Workshops and programs will take place right down the hall from Google developers and engineers, allowing girls to interact with professionals and get a first-hand view of the industry.

State Assemblyman Michael Blake, an avid supporter of diversifying tech, city Chief Technology Officer Minerva Tantoco and Google Head of External Affairs William Floyd were a few of the supporters present to announce the partnership.

“We need a tech sector that looks like the society it serves,” said Floyd. “Building a tech-talent pipeline for girls of color won’t happen overnight, but efforts like these pave the road.”

According to a report by the Center for an Urban Future, 40% of the city’s tech sector consists of women, while only 9% of the sector is represented by African-Americans and 11% by Hispanics.

Founded in 2011, Black Girls CODE offers programs in six states as well as South Africa. Bryant hopes to train more than 1 million girls worldwide by 2040 and establish equal representation in the tech industry.

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